Hiking suggestions in Lofoten

Hiking in the Lofoten Islands is possible for everybody! You can find trips suiting families, seniors and also the ones searching for the highest peaks.

2017-06-1410:07 Mariell Hagen

The weather changes rapidly in Lofoten, so it is a good idea to study the weather forecast before hiking. Warm clothes is recommended, especially on longer trips. Lofoten Turlag can also offer you more information about trips at the Norwegian Trekking Association. www.turistforeningen.no/english/ They also organize trips you can attend. Please see www.lofoten-turlag.no or contact the tourist informations in Lofoten for more information about planned trips.

Always when planning hikes in Lofoten we recommend you to buy a map with marked trails. Even if you are well-trained and an eager hiker, the Lofoten mountains can be rough and not alwas as easy at they seem! If you want to get a guided hike, please see our offers HERE.Do you need maps? Buy maps HERE

Hiking Trails in Lofoten  (some suggestions)

 

Austvågøy and Gimsøy

Hoven (368 m)

The walk up Hoven on Gimsøya is excellent. Start at Hov by the golf links.

Return trip: about 2.5 hours

Tjeldbergtinden (367 m)

Leave the E10 at the Esso station in Osan, Svolvær. Turn second left, follow the track towards the pistol range. At the bend just before the radio mast, turn right and follow the steep path up to the peak. A fairly demanding hike.

About a 2 hour return trip.

 

Vestvågøy:

Ballstad

At Ballstad, start at Kræmmervika/the breakwater and follow a track along the shore to the southern tip of Vestvågøy: Brurstolen. Then continue along Nappstraumen to the ruins at South Græna and North Græna.

Return trip: about 5 hours.

 

Eggum

Start from the fortress at Eggum and follow the road, which eventually turns into a path, to the beacon. Particularly good views of the midnight sun here.

Return trip: 3 hours.

 

Flakstadøy:

Kvalvika

Torsfjorden to Kvalvika is a lovely, but fairly demanding hike. Turn off the E10 to Fredvang and follow the road to Selfjorden. The signposted path to Kvalvika starts in the car park.

Return trip: about 2.5 hours.

 

Andopen

From Napp, a charming old track leads you alongside Nappstraumen to Andopen.

Return trip: 2 hours.

 

Nusfjord–Nesland

Strenuous walk. About 300 metres south of the old school in Nusfjord, a cairned path leads to Nesland. About 200 m before Østre Nesland, there are some giant potholes by the shore. Nesland has Lofoten’s only watermill.

Return trip: about 4 hours. There is lots of great hiking in Flakstad; contact the tourist information centre for some tips.

 

Moskenesøy:

Sørvågvannet

From Sørvågen, an illuminated trail runs around Sørvågvannet lake. A detour up the Studalen valley extends the walk.

Return trip: 1 hour.

 

Bunesstranda

From Reine, take the boat to Vindstad. Follow the road from Vindstad to the end of the fjord and across a small strip of land down to Bunesstranda. This incredible sandy beach is worth the effort! The whole trip, including the boat, takes about 4 hours. The boat can also drop you off in Forsfjord, from where you can walk to Hermanndalstind, Munkebu and Sørvågen.

 

Værøy:

Nupsneset and Håheia

An enjoyable, fairly tough walk takes you past the school to Marka where the road ends. From here, either continue right up the path or road to Håheia, 400 m high, with an incredible panoramic view – or continue through a gravel pit and into beautiful Sørlandshagen. There are many paths to choose between here, but they all eventually lead to Nupsneset. Tip: follow the shore back, and enjoy the lovely pebble beach.

 

Måstad

The walk from Nordlandshagen to Måstad is decidedly more strenuous. The track is marked, and with

sturdy shoes and a bit of stamina you should have a wonderful time. At an easy pace the walk should

take 2 to 3 hours each way. Please remember that the track might be slippery in wet weather.

 

Kvalnesset

Not far from the ferry port is a marked trail to Kvalness Beacon. Lush archipelago area, rich in bird life.

 

Røst:

Steinkirka

The Yellow Trail is the shortest, about 0.5 km long, leading to the ruins of the 1835 stone church, consecrated in 1839 by Bishop Kierschow. It should have held 110 people, but only had 78 seats. The later chancel and sacristy were consecrated in 1883. More information can be found on the board nearby.

 

Ånnhammeren

About 1.5 km long, the Blue Trail leads to Ånnhammeren. Though only 10 metres high, Ånnhammeren is a natural landmark and viewpoint on the island. There is no evidence to suggest that this was a place for spirits (‘ånder’), the name probably coming from the Norwegian ‘ørn’ (eagle). There used to be eagles’ nests here, and it is still an overwhelming sight to see flocks of eagles circling the crag.

The trail leads through a sheltered but flat and open area of bogs and shallow ponds. The vegetation is extremely diverse because of the huge variations in salinity.